Looking For A New Project

It’s time to find a new project!

What I’m looking for is a role as an agile software tester in a team that really strives to improve on agile techniques in both, testing and programming. I’m interested in learning more about DevOps, continuous delivery and automation, including but not limited to test automation.

Travelling in Northern Germany or Denmark is fine and a possibility to work (partially) remote would be lovely.

Technically, a project using Ruby and/or Rails would be fantastic. In case the team is working on steps to also use Elixir, that would be a bonus.

More about my previous work is available over at ‘work with me‘ as well as on my Xing profile.

‚Agile Testing Condensed‘ — A Review

Agile Testing Condensed‘ is the 3rd book by Janet Gregory and Lisa Crispin. As the title already indicates, it’s a short book – the print version has about 100 pages. Luckily, I got a printed version at the Agile Testing Days 2019 in Potsdam and had it signed.

The book covers the important topics of testing in an agile context on a high level. For details it regularly refers to the other books ‘Agile Testing‘ and ‘More Agile Testing‘ (to which I contributed a section). One topic the book returns to regularly is the ‘Whole Team Approach’. I like this first of all, because to me this is the core part of agile testing. In my experience, it is this aspect that troubles teams. And second of all, I this is great, because the details described in the other books, can, at times, make it hard to see this overarching relation.

If I had to name one thing that might be improved, that would be the size of the images. To me, they came out a bit too small to be easy to read. Since I also bought the ebook (where I can zoom the images), that’s not a big deal.

I highly recommend reading ‘Agile Testing Condensed’ to everybody who is looking for an overview of the topic or who likes to have a reference at hand to quickly look up a certain aspect.

Calling Me Names — New Labels

After a one year break, I was back to the Agile Testing Days this year (2019). Damian Synadinos gave a great keynote “More Than That“, where he explained, that we are more than ‘just’ testers. We can also be: parents, programmers, trainers, musicians, comedians… The list is long. This got me thinking about labels and titles I’ve put on (or used) myself.

In another talk Tobias Geyer shared his thoughts about wizards & witches (from Terry Pratchett’s series of novels about the disc world) in “Wizards, Witches and Testing” and in it he compared the witches and wizards of the disc world to testers and programmers. Given this input, I clearly identify myself as a witch.

During the breaks, I kept thinking about which labels I could put on myself, especially some that may be a tad bit far-fetched: Since I have some bits of high-tech implanted in my body I could be labeled as a cyborg, technically.

Following a similar thought: If one consumed blood of other people, that make one a vampire. And I did, during an operation last year, I thankfully received a transfusion.

Hmm, a vampire cyborg. There must be more positive sounding labels!

Then, there was a “AgileTD Late Night Talk Show” hosted by Daniël Maslyn. I was invited as a guest to speak about my cancer treatment I went through during the last year and a half. Daniël labeled me as a Jedi Knight, for having gone through this. Thank you! “Jedi Knight” — that’s a label that sounds much more positive! 🥳

"IT DEPENDS" Certified Practitioner

Also during the conference, I became a certified practitioner of “It Depends”, thanks to the exam by Gitte Klitgaard. Very nice, too!

And just after the Agile Testing Days, I took and passed the exam to become an  Agile Testing Fellow

Other than that, since 2013 I occasionally become SuperAgilePerson.

A tiny part of @Stuartliveart‘s sketch note from Agile Testing Days 2015

Let’s combine all those labels:

Cyborg Vampire Agile Testing Fellow
It-Depends Practitioner SuperAgilePerson Jedi Knight Witch

Oh, what a title! I won’t use all of those labels all the time, certainly not on a business card. 😉

What are your labels and titles?

Looking for a New Project

Exciting times: It’s time to find a new project!

What I’m looking for is a role as a software tester in a team that really strives to improve on agile techniques in both, testing and programming. I’m interested in learning more about DevOps, continuous delivery and automation, including but not limited to test automation.

What I’d prefer is a project, that allows — or expects — remote work. Travelling in Northern Germany or Denmark every other week is fine.

Technically, a project using Ruby and/or Rails would be fantastic. In case the team is working on steps to also use Elixir, that would be a bonus.

A caveat: My availability in November is limited, due to a keynote I’ll give at the Agile Testing Days.

More about my previous work is available over at ‘work with me‘ as well as on my Xing profile.

Agile Testing Days 2019: A Keynote

I’ll be giving a Keynote at the Agile Testing Days 2019 in Potsdam, Germany: “Being Lucky”.

Stehpan's Keynote at ATD: Being Lucky

Here’s the abstract:

Good fortune can be influenced, so let’s do it.
Do you think a little more luck in your life could help?
Someone at the Agile Testing Days once noticed that I seem to be a particularly lucky person. This made me ponder: Am I lucky? When? How often? Where? I also asked myself, whether it’s possible to influence luck.
Episodes, some from this very conference right from the beginning in 2009, illustrate how luck can strike. However, it doesn’t necessarily feel like a lucky moment at the time it happens. It may actually feel embarrassing and stressful. These stories also provide some heuristics to help you become more lucky.
Lesson learned: While luck can’t entirely be controlled, it might in fact be shaped in our favour.

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