Agile Testing Days 2019: A Keynote

I’ll be giving a Keynote at the Agile Testing Days 2019 in Potsdam, Germany: “Being Lucky”.

Stehpan's Keynote at ATD: Being Lucky

Here’s the abstract:

Good fortune can be influenced, so let’s do it.
Do you think a little more luck in your life could help?
Someone at the Agile Testing Days once noticed that I seem to be a particularly lucky person. This made me ponder: Am I lucky? When? How often? Where? I also asked myself, whether it’s possible to influence luck.
Episodes, some from this very conference right from the beginning in 2009, illustrate how luck can strike. However, it doesn’t necessarily feel like a lucky moment at the time it happens. It may actually feel embarrassing and stressful. These stories also provide some heuristics to help you become more lucky.
Lesson learned: While luck can’t entirely be controlled, it might in fact be shaped in our favour.

Agile Testing Days 2016 — Part 6: Conference Day 3

For the 3rd conference day, I’d like to mention two highlights: Ida Karine Bohlin‘s “The Tinder Project—How To Test The Right Swipes” and Gojko Adzic‘s keynote “Snow White and the 777.777.777 Dwarfs“.

Ida introduced Tinder, an online service to meet people. It can be used to find someone to have a chat at an airport or meet a lifetime partner. She described how she applied her testing knowledge to search for a partner on Tinder. The compilation of acceptance criteria  was hilarious already, including a good dozen aspects from handsome (but not weak) to strong enough so he could help with heavy luggage at airports. She presented the testing quadrant for identifying test approaches she applied and a testing pyramid to be used. To me, the topic of agile testing was very well presented, the talk was very funny and entertaining. Well done, Ida! I believe it would make a great keynote to introduce the topic of agile testing at a conference!

Gojko presented some aspects, that he believes will change the world of testing in dramatic ways. Two of the reasons for these changes are the ever decreasing cost of computation in general (e.g. by  services such as AWS Lambda), and the decreasing time needed to fix issues after production defects are found.

When applying a micro service architecture, the single service can be tiny — Gojko talks about a few dozen lines of code. With so little code, finding the cause of a bug is typically easy. (At least a lot easier than in a code base containing hundreds or thousands of lines.)

Let me finish with just one tweet about this talk (there are many more on Twitter):

Due to Gojko’s presentation there was a whole new session dedicated to “Gojko’s Future” during the unconference day that followed this 3rd day of Agile Testing Days 2016. But since that’s another day, I will cover it in the next blog post.

Agile Testing Days 2016 — Part 2

StephanKaemper_atd_banner_880x440

Here’s a short reminder that I’ll be speaking at the Agile Testing Days 2016 this December. As the banner says: If you’re planning to attend the conference, ask me for a discount (it’s a coupon code) and I’ll be happy to send it out.

There’s a promotion video in the previous post “Agile Testing Days 2016 — Part I: Promotion Video“. Hope you enjoy it!

 

The Agile Testing Days 2015: Nuggets

The opening session of the Agile Testing Days 2015 was Western-themed and Janet Gregory and Lisa Crispin asked the audience to watch for gold nuggets at the conference — particularly valuable information or other things we would take home. I (actually my alter ego Super Agile Person) was invited to present my suggests at the ending session. So these are the nuggets I found at the conference:

  1. I got a Calgary Stampede hat from Lisa and Janet. Thank you so much!calgary-stampede-hat_2It’s great, it fits and it even has inner values printed on the inside:
    1. Commitment to Community
    2. Integrity
    3. Pride of Place
    4. Western Hospitality

    The first two of them are particularly applicable in all communities.

  2. In their opening keynote Alex Schladebeck (violin) and Huib Schoots (trombone) connected music to testing and played music too. They even handed out a large number of kazoos to the audience to play along with them!
    I find the connection they drew fascinating, since other presentations I attended this year presented connections between testing and other activities. Two examples from FullStackFest are Ernie Miller‘s talk “How to Build a Skyscraper” and Lauren Scott‘s presentation “Shall I Compare Thee to a Line of Code?“.
    I’m thinking about other connections, but that’s another blog post.
  3. Many people use templates to write user stories or charters for exploratory testing sessions. A widely used user story template is this:
    As a <role>;
    I want <feature>,
    so that <benefit>

    While these templates can be very helpful to start, they are also somewhat limiting — and can lead to outcomes like ‘As the product owner I want feature X, so that feature X can be used’. This is not — repeat not — how the template is used well.
    While templates can be worthwhile to get started with using user stories (for example), they can become too constraining as a team becomes more proficient in using them.
    In that case, I suggest to use the term Free Style User Stories and Karen Greaves already helped me spreading the word:

    Thank you!
    This too, will be covered in a future blog post.

  4. Finding followers and starting a movement is possible for everyone. This was a popular topic in a number of sessions, Dr. Sue Black‘s keynote “If I Can Do It, So Can You” in particular.

Note, ‘nugget finding’ is not limited to conferences! What are the nuggets you found in the past week?

Announcement: Workshop & ebook: “Fast Feedback Using Ruby”

At the “London Tester Gathering Workshops 2015” (also see #LTGWorkshops on Twitter) I offer a workshop “Fast Feedback Loops & Fun with Ruby”. For this, I wanted to give attendees a handout, to make applying the stuff covered easier and it was planned to be a list of brief recipes.
Suffice to say that the handout grew (and it’s entirely possible that this is ‘feature creep’ in action). In fact, it grew to the point that I decided to turn it into an ebook. The book is not done yet, there’s some copy editing to do.

Fast Feedback Using Ruby

In any case: There will be an ebook, and it will be available on LeanPub at https://leanpub.com/fastfeedbackusingruby/. If you’re interested, please leave a note on the book’s pages.

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